In The Spirit Of Halloween

“Little Fears” series (wip)

Have you ever been scared of something you know was a bit silly? For those who have been with me for awhile, you probably know from an earlier post that one of those silly things that scared me was rabbits. Yes, cute little bunny rabbits. Thanks to the 1978 animated movie, Watership Down, those adorable little creatures have been a life long terrifying bundle of cuteness for me. So I decided to deal with that fear through art which prompted my art card drawing “Hazel“. It’s amazing how working through that drawing and doing a little research on rabbits helped me through how much those little creatures would freak me out. It helped to the point that I have now added the rabbit to my short list of spirit animals.
Since then I’ve been thinking about other creatures in Nature that cause me to wig out.
So in the spirit of this upcoming Halloween season here are the beginnings of a three part art card series on other creatures that cause my heart to race a little faster, inspired to triumph over those little childhood fears that still lurk in the shadows of our adult lives, projecting themselves into our daily realities at the most inopportune times…though I doubt that any of these will end up on my spirit list. 😋

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Botanical Art

“Magnolia” – by Q. Rumbley

As an artist who is mostly inspired by Nature and all of her creations, I’ve always had a bit of an interest in botanical art. Every now and then I try my hand at doing something botanical. Can’t say I’m all that great at it, especially since I’m doing it using the pointillism technique but I try. From what I’ve seen most botanical art pieces are done using watercolors or ink washes, mediums that just boggle my mind, yet make for some rather vivid and life like visuals. Pointillism is a bit of a departure in regards to techniques used for the art and is more so seen on the textbook scientific end of illustrating plants. Either way, it still makes for some good art.
Here are a few artists who I follow on Instagram that create some rather wonderful works of botanical artistry that are inspiring and delightful. 😀

Darren Sleep – @artyplantsman

Seinjeong Lee – @4lee5

Lauren Boles – @laurenbolesart

Media Jamshidi – @mediajamshidi

Eagle

Nature and all her creations has always been a source of inspiration for me. So here’s a eagle sketch I scribbled out while meddling around with some colored pencils and pens.

Determined

“Peacock” (wip)

“It doesn’t matter how slow you go so long as you keep going.” ~ Chinese Proverb

I’m determined to finish this drawing but for the life of me it feels like my progress is moving at a snails pace. It’s challenging to fill in solid areas with a bunch of tiny dots but I am happy about what progress I have made and that I’m adamant about completing this. I tend to stick to doing drawings of a smaller size so finishing this is equivalent to climbing Mt. Everest for me, especially with the level of detail. I still have a number of feathers to finish and some work on defining the shadows and highlights more but I’ve got my fingers crossed for finishing this up in about a week or so. In the meantime have a wonderful Sunday afternoon. 😊

“Peacock” close up.

Imitation

It’s said that imitation is the highest form of flattery. In the field of creativity, sometimes imitation can get in the way of personal growth and authenticity.

Have you ever looked at another artist’s work and thought “Wow! That’s amazing. I want my work to look like that.” And then set out to try and incorporate that artist’s style and technique into your own work? When we were young we might have done this. But as we grow as an artist it can become a hindrance to the development of your own style and technique. I used to do this a lot in my early years of drawing. Back then I had a number of artists whose work I admired and tried to get my own work to imitate theirs, which can be a good way to practice and learn specific techniques. But the thing about imitating someone else’s work is that if you get into the habit of imitating, it’s easy to slip into becoming really good at just copying without ever really developing a style that’s all your own. It can also have the off handed effect of causing you to compare and devalue your own work. You may find yourself so focused on trying to get your art to look similar to another artist that you completely miss how your own style maybe unfolding or worse, you may get discouraged and feel that your art is no good if you’re not able to adequately replicate the other artist’s style.
There’s nothing wrong with admiring someone else’s work and being inspired to improve upon your own. But as an artist one has to be careful not to fall into the trap of striving to imitate the styles of others that you end up squelching the seeds of uniqueness in your own development