3 Lessons I’ve Learned To Maintain A Leveled Head As An Artist

The path of a creative is a challenging one. I know I’ve said this before and more than likely I’ll probably say it again. I try to be polite about things but I’m not much for sugar coating. I never want to give anyone the impression being an artist or doing any kind of creative work for a living is easy. Far from it. I do enjoy my work though, which gives me a satisfaction that I never experienced doing anything else. But that satisfaction does come with some interesting challenges and some lasting life lessons. So here are three lessons I’ve learned that has helped to keep my ego grounded as an independent artist.

1. You’re not entitled to anyone’s attention. You may work hard. You may have exquisite skills in your craft. You may have even created the best masterpiece of the century. But no matter how amazing you may think your work is nobody is obligated to appreciate it or buy it. Sometimes you may have an inner hissy fit when you don’t get the recognition you think you deserve for your hard work but reality is, unless someone has requested or commissioned you to create the work, no one is really obligated to take notice of it. It’s a difficult pill to swallow. You spend hours, weeks, months maybe even years working on a piece. You finish. You put yourself out there by sharing it with the world. You wait in anticipation for a response, some form of recognition…and all you get are crickets. In such times you can either have a temper tantrum, slip into a soul crushing depression or get back to work on something new, giving it your best effort like you did on your last piece.

2. No matter how good you think you are, there will always be someone out there who is doing work that may be considered better than yours…always. Art is a pretty subjective field so being a great artist isn’t about competing with other artists. If you’re approaching your craft as some type of competition then you’re spending way too much time looking at the works of other artists and comparing yourself. The only artist you should be comparing yourself to is the artist you are today in comparison to the artist you were yesterday.

3. It’s impossible to create art that everyone will like or want to buy. Don’t sit around racking your brain trying to figure out what people will like. Trust me on this one, I used to do this all the time and it only leads to disappoinment and mediocre work. Nothing stifles creative energy than trying to appeal to the masses. Create work that makes you eager to come back to your easel. The kind of work that you try to fight off sleep for because you just don’t want to stop working. And then hone your own niche. Not everyone will like or be impressed with your work…but some will. And when you find them or they find you, be grateful because just as I mentioned in the first lesson, they’re not obligated to pay you any attention but they are and that’s a wonderful thing.

With that said, I just want to send out a heartfelt THANK YOU, to all of you who take the time out of your busy lives to follow, “like”, comment and buy my work. You play a big part in keeping me going and I truly appreciate your interest in art. Thank you.🙏😊

Advertisements

A Few Inspirational Gems

I can’t say I’m an avid reader on art. My personal library isn’t filled with magazines and books on artists or art related material. Nor do I keep up on the latest art trends and movements. Personally I have this thought that has burrowed its way deep into my brain and that’s that too much art ruins art. I don’t know where that came from and maybe it’s a bad idea to have stuck in your psyche as an artist but I just feel that being too deeply immersed in the art world may have too much of an influence on the art I create and therefore lead me away for my own authenticity. But every now and then I come across some gems of inspiration or a book that serves as a wellspring of artistic motivation that I just have to have for myself. Two of those gems…well, my only gems, are the books “Art Inc” by Lisa Congdon and “Creative Authenticity: 16 Principles To Clarify and Deepen Your Artistic Vision” by Ian Roberts.

Art Inc is a wonderful gem of practical and inspirational information. It’s filled with short but insightful interviews with artists on how they make a living, tips on the ways in which you can sell your artwork, whether through galleries, online or licensing and it comes complete with a list of resources such as what platforms are available to sell online, printing services, professional organizations and many more useful resources that might be of interest to creatives.

Creative Authenticity is my art bible. Whenever I have doubts, feel unsure about my craft or the direction I want go, this is the one book I reach for. It brings together the spiritual, the philosophical and psychological aspects of being an artist into 16 principles that are easy to digest. I have to admit that it is because of this book I haven’t looked much further or else where for inspiration and solace. It’s full of  rememberable quotes and encouraging words to help keep the creative fires burning when you feel your spirit getting low. I encourage any creative to give these books a look see but if they’re really not your cup of tea here’s a wonderful little article from Creative Boom that list other inspirational gems that as an artist you may be interested in adding to your personal library.  

10 Great Books For Artists and Makers Launching A Creative Business. 

If you’re curious as to what my process to stippling looks like, I’ve done a few timelapse videos, from a while ago, for a behind the scenes look. This particular video is of a ACEO drawing I did called “Phree”. I also have a basic visual how-to that briefly explains how I use color that can be viewed here.

Inking “Phree”

Open Letter to 2016 Political Candidates | Copyright Alliance

Copyright Alliance has drafted an open letter to our 2016 political candidates, for any artist, creator or supporter to sign, urging them to maintain America’s commitment to the right of creators to determine when and how they share their works in the global marketplace. I’ve signed this petition out of concern for the increasing misuse and abuse that has taken place on the internet of the works of artists and creators. If this is a concern of yours then you should probably take a look at this petition. I firmly believe that copyright laws should also apply to internet uses and that platforms, companies or individuals should not be allowed to profit off of the works of creators without the expressed permission and compensation to the creator and that attribution, where applicable should be given to the creator. There’s nothing worse than discovering your work has been hijacked by some company like in the case of Urban Outfitters. 

Please take a look at this petition and sign if your heart feels compelled.

Open Letter To 2016 Political Candidates
Thank you. ❤

A Very Brief Demo On How I Carve Linoblocks

image

1. Tools:
linoleum block
Speedball cutter
my design
Sharpie  

In this brief demo I’ve decided to do the Chinese character for “peace” as my design
2. I draw out the design on the linoleum block and since I don’t intend on using this for making prints in the usual custom so I’m not concerned with reversing it.
3. The Speedball cutter comes with six cutters that provides various forms and shapes of cuts.
4. Using the #6 blade I trace my design so that the cut can provide a stopping point for when I start removing the linoleum.
5. Using the #4 cutter I start removing the linoleum from around the design.
6. With all of the linoleum removed, my design is ready for some color.
7. At this point I take a Sharpie and color in my design.
8. …and there you have it! “Peace” all finished.