Succulent (wip2)

image

Taking my time with building this drawing. I’m working with only nine colors; six primaries along with brown, rose and black. Trying to create different colors along with various hues with a limited palette is a bit challenging but fun. I tend to think that creativity flourishes not when their are many options but rather when your options are limited.

Woodlouse

image

Woodlouse – archival colored ink on 4×4 Strathmore Bristol vellum

It’s not often that I work in color. From experience, it’s a bit more tedious than working with just black ink when it comes to stippling. But sometimes black gets a bit monotonous to me and I need a little splash of color. Working on 4×4 Bristol vellum didn’t feel near as tedious as working on say, a 9×12 piece, so I rather enjoyed doing this little drawing rather than feeling anxious about the time it would take for me to finish. I guess the key for me is to keep things on the small side, which I’m beginning to see is the overarching theme of my life.

Nectar (wip)

image

Coming along…albeit slowly. I’ve been a bit busy with life or more correctly put, distracted with life and have only gotten a little inking done on this piece. Admittedly, I was a little frustrated with this drawing at first. You know how you have it in your mind how you want something to turn out yet as you go about trying to do so, it doesn’t seem to go the way you imagined? Yeah, that’s what was going on with this one for me. I found myself getting a bit impatient, which is ironic being as the drawing technique I employ requires a great deal of patience. But it isn’t necessarily the technique that I get impatient with, it’s myself I tend to get short with, especially when I’m trying to achieve something and it isn’t going the way I imagined. So I put this aside for a minute and started something new, which gave me the chance to calm down and gather myself. Now I’m back at it. I suspect that all of this is just a part of my process in creating art.

Color Stippling – A Basic How-To

image

Here’s a simple visual how-to on color stippling. This works great when your  drawing calls for mostly primary colors but when you get into skin tones and  the such you need to be a bit more creative when it comes to choosing the  colors to create your shadows. When you need for your colors to be deeper, place your dots closer  together. When you need for them to be lighter, place them further  apart. A rule of thumb is don’t use black  otherwise your shadows will look too harsh. Then again, once you get the  hang of this, rules can be broken. Other than that have fun and play around with the colors to see what works for you but if you’re looking for a starting point work with primary colors until you get comfortable and then explore from there.